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Corruption in India and RTI Act 2005

India’s Right to Information Act had become a tool for the public to challenge the country

The New York Times reported on the 28th that corruption is deeply entrenched in India, but India implemented the Right to Know Act five years ago, and poor people gained the power to question the government and became a weapon for the public to challenge the government.

Although this law helps many poor people get government help, some believe that the right to know law cannot eradicate corruption and the lack of accountability mechanisms makes this law useless.


RTI Act 2005 diluted by the Government

In fact, it is wrong to say that the act has been diluted. For the corrupt, its now a protective shield rather. Now it is absolutely useless and it has rather made the responsible immune to information disclosure so the RTI Act is acting as a tool to hide corruption. Now appointment and removal of commissioner is absolutely in the hands of government so its impossible that the commissioner would issue any such order that goes against the government.

 

Chanchala Devi lives in a remote village in India. She hopes to own a brick house instead of living in a house made of mud. When she heard that the Indian government had launched a plan that would provide her with about $ 700 to build her dream house, Devi immediately submitted an application to the government.

Devi belongs to the lower caste class, is a temporary worker who is paid on a daily basis, and lives very poorly. It should have been an ideal applicant for the government's rescue plan. However, she waited for four years for this, watching the wealthy neighbor get government funding and build a house. She and her three children could only live in a leaky house.

 

Right to Information Law

However, two months ago, the Right to Information law, which was warmly welcomed by Indian residents, helped her. With the help of a local political activist, Devi submitted an application to the local government office, asking the government to track down who had received government funding while she was waiting hard for government assistance, and hoped to find out why. Good news came a few days later, Devi's application was approved, and funding was quickly available.

 

Devi's good luck is only part of India's information revolution. Although India may be the largest democracy in the world, it is also a huge and powerful bureaucratic country.

India is an Empire State Building based on feudalism, and the public has very limited ways of understanding government actions. But the far-reaching law of the Right to Know Act grants power to 1.2 billion residents of India, giving them the right to obtain almost all information from the Indian government and making the government transparent.

If Indian officials refuse to provide information, they will be subject to high fines, which ensures the rapid implementation of the Right to Know Act.

 

Right to Information Act 2005 of India

Since India’s Right to Know Act passed parliamentary approval five years ago, it has become a tool for rural residents in India and has changed the balance of power in India. In the three years before the bill was introduced, Indian residents submitted a total of 2 million applications.

The Indian government has long favored the interests of government officials and politicians.


Right to Information Act 2005

Wajahat Habibullah, Chief Information Commissioner of the Central Government of India, said:

“The Indian government has always given the impression that government officials are the rulers and the people are the rulers. The Law on the Right to Know makes residents feel the sense of responsibility of the Indian government to the people.

 

Former Indian Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi once said that only 15% of the Indian government’s allocation for poor residents reached residents, and other funds were either wasted or corrupted.

Although this data may have improved over the past few decades, Indian residents still question the government.

India plans to allocate about 47 billion U.S. dollars to help poor Indian citizens this year, but some people suspect that a lot of funds have disappeared.

 

Although the Indian government pays more attention to the demands of the people, this does not mean that corruption will be reduced.

Sunil Kumar Mahato, a political activist in Jharkhand, India, said the use of this law to expose corruption is meaningless. He mentioned a road construction project, saying: "The money was spent, but the road was not seen."

When Mahato submitted an application to the government to find out the reason, the Indian government re-funded the road. But the Indian government has not taken any action to deal with corrupt people.


Mahato said:

"The connections between politicians, contractors and bureaucrats are very close and it is very difficult to take action against these people."

 

Some commentators question whether the bill is just a pressure valve that allows people to obtain basic needs without challenging the status quo.

Venkatesh Nayak, a member of the Commonwealth Human Rights Initiative, said: "This law is very successful in eradicating small corruption, but our accountability mechanism is relatively weak, and increasing transparency in the absence of accountability is meaningless.

However, some people think that In India, which has emerged from colonial and feudal rule, combating corruption is only a secondary task. Granting citizen rights is the main goal. This law gives Indian citizens the power to question the government.



India's right to know law becomes a national challenge to the people, the government must be fully transparent

India is an emerging global power, but it is also a country with deep-rooted bureaucratic rule. As an "Empire State Building" based on feudal culture, ordinary people have very limited ways of understanding government actions. On June 21, 2005, India's "Information Rights Law 2005" was formally promulgated.

The aim is to grant power to India’s 1.2 billion residents, giving them the right to obtain almost all information from the Indian government, and to make the government transparent.

However, some critics say that although this law has helped many poor people get government help, it cannot eradicate corruption, and the lack of accountability mechanisms makes this law useless.

 

Indian Information Rights Law brings certain benefits to ordinary people

 

India's Right to Information Act 2005

    China.com, June 29. According to a report by the New York Times on the 28th, corruption is deeply entrenched in India, but India implemented the Right to Know Act five years ago, and poor people gained the power to question the government and became a weapon for the public to challenge the government.

 Although this law helps many poor people get government help, some believe that the right to know law cannot eradicate corruption and the lack of accountability mechanisms makes this law useless.

 

Chanchala Devi lives in a remote village in India. She hopes to own a brick house instead of living in a house made of mud. When she heard that the Indian government had launched a plan that would provide her with about $ 700 to build her dream house, Devi immediately submitted an application to the government.

Devi belongs to the lower caste class, is a temporary worker who is paid on a daily basis, and lives very poorly. It should have been an ideal applicant for the government's rescue plan. However, she waited for four years for this, watching the wealthy neighbor get government funding and build a house. She and her three children could only live in a leaky house.

 

However, two months ago, the Law of the Right to Know (also known as the Information Rights Legislative Editor’s Note), which was warmly welcomed by Indian residents, helped her.

With the help of a local political activist, Devi submitted an application to the local government office, asking the government to track down who had received government funding while she was waiting hard for government assistance, and hoped to find out why. Good news came a few days later, Devi's application was approved, and funding was quickly available.

 

Devi's good luck is only part of India's information revolution. Although India proudly calls itself "the world's largest democratic country," internal bureaucratic rule is deeply entrenched. This Empire State Building, built on the basis of feudalism, has a very limited way for the public to understand government actions.

But the far-reaching law of the Right to Know Act grants power to 1.2 billion residents of India, giving them the right to obtain almost all information from the Indian government and making the government transparent. If Indian officials refuse to provide information, they will be subject to high fines, which ensures the rapid implementation of the Right to Know Act.

 

Since India’s Right to Know Act was approved by Parliament five years ago, it has become a tool for rural residents in India and has changed the balance of power in India.

In the three years before the bill was introduced, Indian residents submitted a total of 2 million applications.

The Indian government has long favored the interests of government officials and politicians.

Wajahat Habibullah, Chief Information Commissioner of the Central Government of India, said: “The Indian government has always given the impression that government officials are the rulers and the people are the rulers. The Law on the Right to Know makes residents feel the sense of responsibility of the Indian government to the people.

 

Former Indian Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi once said that only 15% of the Indian government’s allocation for poor residents reached the residents, and other funds were either wasted or corrupted.

Although this data may have improved over the past few decades, Indian residents still question the government. India plans to allocate about 47 billion U.S. dollars to help poor Indian citizens this year, but some people suspect that a lot of funds have disappeared.

 

Although the Indian government pays more attention to the demands of the people, this does not mean that corruption will be reduced.

Sunil Kumar Mahato, a political activist in Jharkhand, India, said the use of this law to expose corruption is meaningless.

He mentioned a road construction project, saying: "The money was spent, but the road was not seen." When Mahato submitted an application to the government to find out the reason, the Indian government re-funded the road. But the Indian government has not taken any action to deal with corrupt people.

Mahato said: "The connections between politicians, contractors and bureaucrats are very close and it is very difficult to take action against these people."

 

Some evaluators question whether this bill is just a pressure valve that allows people to obtain basic needs without challenging the status quo.

Venkatesh Nayak, a member of the Commonwealth Human Rights Initiative, said: "This law is very successful in eradicating small corruption, but our accountability mechanism is relatively weak, and increasing transparency in the absence of accountability is meaningless.

However, some people think that In India, which is free from colonial and feudal rule, combating corruption is only a secondary task, and the granting of civil rights is the main goal. This law gives Indian citizens the power to question the government. It is a big step forward.

 

    The 21st century is the century of India? Interpretation of the knots of India's great powers:

    Global Magazine News before India’s independence, Nehru, who later became India’s first prime minister, wrote his vision of the country in India’s Discovery- India wants to become a first-class power with “sound and color”. When India finally got rid of British colonial rule, the "great power" became a knot of the social elites.

 

    Today, the dream of a big country is no longer the patent of a small number of Indian social elites, but the will of the people. The goals of the big powers have also become clear from ambiguity, that is, the total economic volume occupies the forefront of the world, the industrial structure has entered the post-industrial era, the democratization of the political system, the influence of national culture has expanded, and the international status has been greatly improved, etc.

 

    India's flying dream encountered multiple stumbling blocks:

    1. Corruption issue: Corruption exposure of Indian officials: promotion and salary increase of children retired at the age of five

    China News Service Nintromjo died in 1985, but "continued" to receive a pension, and even got promoted a few years later. When his family asked for information about Nintromjo’s pension, they were turned away by the authorities, but in the end they were told that Nintromcho was promoted in 1998 and received a sum of money three years later, pension.

Nintemjo’s son said: “Someone used false materials to get my dad ’s salary, and later took his pension for granted.”

 

   2. The remnants of feudalism: the tragedy of the Indian caste system couples were honoured

   International Online: The bodies of 9-year-old Asha Sini and 21-year-old Jogsh Kumar were recently discovered in the slums of New Delhi. The death showed that the legs and arms of the two were bound, and the hands and feet were marked with electric shocks.

A police investigation found that Sini and Kumar were originally a close lover, but because of the low caste level of the Kumar family, their love affair was strongly opposed by the female family.

In order to protect the family honor, Sini’s uncle and other relatives decided to execute “honorary execution” on the two.

 

    3. Bureaucracy: the convenience of doing business is at a lower position and the reform encounters many resistances

    Guangzhou Daily News In a report of the World Bank, it ranked the convenience of doing business in 178 countries in the world, of which India ranked 120th. The report said that India lags behind some countries in this respect.

Although India’s reforms over the past decade have made the economy’s growth rate compelling and attracted investors from all over the world, investors still find that India’s bureaucratic minefield is difficult to overcome. Analysts and business people said that this issue is still the biggest stumbling block for India to attract foreign investment.

 

     Analyze the influence of India's diverse society on national character, including tolerance and conflict:

     Global Magazine News From the perspective of ethnic composition, almost all ethnic groups in the world today live here, forming more than 100 ethnic groups. In addition, there are hundreds of tribal groups distributed around. They use 700 officially registered languages ​​(dialects of less than 1,000 people are not listed here), and the main languages ​​are as many as 18.

From the perspective of religion, there are not only Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism and Sikhism that originated in the local area, but also Islamism, Christianity and Suoyaoistism spread from other regions. From the perspective of culture and art, various regions of India have distinctive folk arts such as music, dance, sculpture, and painting.

From the perspective of political power, India has as many as more than 1,000 officially registered political parties, whose political opinions are varied and their organizational structures vary widely.

 

Indian-style democracy is more localized and fights hard against corruption:

    Global Magazine News India's current political system has fully accepted the three-party parliamentary democratic system transplanted from the United Kingdom and the supporting administrative system.

However, the political system originating in the West has mutated in the land of India, and has produced more and more local colors.

The shadow of the "family politics" that has emerged from the one-party monopoly is still lingering, and the Nehru family's exclusive status in Indian politics has not disappeared. Indian-style democracy has been very different from the Western model.

On the one hand, it has at least built a platform for people to express their political will, and on the other hand, it has manifested obvious immaturity. Prevalent and other stubborn illnesses are struggling hard.




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